4th Grade
Iroquois Nation Web Quest
Created by Mrs. Young

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Introduction
    You are a Native American!  You are one of the first humans to ever set foot on New York soil.  Your tribe has decided to move from Canada into what is now known as New York.  You are of the Iroquois Nation.  You are the leader of your clan.  Along with the other clan leaders you must locate the perfect spot in this new land to set up your village.  You must work with the other clan leaders to be sure your village will prosper.

 

Click on this picture to learn more about New York State

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Task    You will have three tasks to complete:

1.    What should you look for when you choose your place for settlement?  Explain.

2.    Explain what most Iroquois villages look like and what the lives are like for each member.  Adults (men & women) and children have different roles in village life. Be prepared to discuss these roles both in work and play.

3.    With the other clan leaders create a diorama of your village.

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Process

                       

1.    Your teacher will assign you to a clan. Find a member from each clan (Bear, Turtle, Wolf, Hawk & Beaver) to be in your group.  Make sure there is only one member from each clan.

2.     Each member of your group should search the internet for information regarding Iroquois villages.
    What type of landforms are the villages usually built upon?
    Why do they build their villages next to water?
    What do they build around their villages and why?
    What type of houses do they build?
    What do the houses look like inside and out?
    What else would be in the village?
    What roles do the men, women and children have?
    What do the Iroquois do for fun?
    Name the tribes in the Iroquois Confederacy.

Please print the following worksheet to answer the questions.  
 Questions in worksheet form.

3.    Compare your answers with your group members.  If you disagree with an answer please show each other where you found your information.  If you need help, ask your teacher.

4.     Work with the other clan leaders in your group to plan an Iroquois village. Use the answers to the questions to help you plan the village.  Make a sketch of your village and label each part. Show your sketch to your teacher.

5.    Make a diorama of your village.  Your teacher will give you a large box to use for the diorama. 

6.    On a 5x8 index card, write a short paragraph describing the scene taking place in your diorama.  At the bottom of the card, write the names of the clan leaders in your group.

7.   We will display all the villages in our classroom for everyone to share!

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Resources

Iroquois
    The Six Nations of the Iroquois Confederacy

    Clothing
    Iroquois Culture
    All About Iroquois

Iroquois Villages
    A interactive view of an Iroquois village.

    Crawford Lake (Iroquois Village)

Longhouses
    Longhouses

    The Longhouse

Recreation
    Life in an Iroquois Village

    Songs and Dances
    Listening to Songs
    Iroquois Stories

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Evaluation

Rubric for diorama
This rubric was created using RubiStar for teachers.

IntroductionTask Process | Resources | Evaluation | Conclusion | Teacher Page | Credits | Back to Top

 

Conclusion

    Native Americans have been living in New York for many years.  Today most Native Americans live on reservations.  In our next unit we will look at how New York changed as explorers came to the continent.  How do you think the Native Americans felt about these newcomers?  As explorers came to New York they wanted to occupy  land.  They were very excited about owning and farming the new land.  Native Americans believed that land is not something that humans can own.  They believed that people only walk the Earth for a short time and should honor the land and share it freely with other living creatures.  How may these two points of view become a conflict between the Europeans and the Native Americans?

 

This page is maintained in accordance with Shenendehowa's web publishing guidelines by Renée Young.