Acadia students in Randy Symonds’ tech class engineered dragster cars using a design process in Autodesk Inventor a computer drawing program. With this they were able to identify the cars weight, projected frontal area, and anticipate an average speed.  One car went 40′ in .3 seconds  that’s 108 mph. More photos…

Written by on June 21, 2019

Acadia students in Randy Symonds' tech class engineered dragster cars using a design process in Autodesk Inventor a computer drawing program. With this they were able to identify the cars weight, projected frontal area, and anticipate an average speed.  One car went 40' in .3 seconds  that's 108 mph. More photos...  Acadia students in Randy Symonds' tech class engineered dragster cars using a design process in Autodesk Inventor a computer drawing program. With this they were able to identify the cars weight, projected frontal area, and anticipate an average speed.  One car went 40' in .3 seconds  that's 108 mph. More photos... Acadia students in Randy Symonds' tech class engineered dragster cars using a design process in Autodesk Inventor a computer drawing program. With this they were able to identify the cars weight, projected frontal area, and anticipate an average speed.  One car went 40' in .3 seconds  that's 108 mph. More photos... Acadia students in Randy Symonds' tech class engineered dragster cars using a design process in Autodesk Inventor a computer drawing program. With this they were able to identify the cars weight, projected frontal area, and anticipate an average speed.  One car went 40' in .3 seconds  that's 108 mph. More photos... Acadia students in Randy Symonds' tech class engineered dragster cars using a design process in Autodesk Inventor a computer drawing program. With this they were able to identify the cars weight, projected frontal area, and anticipate an average speed.  One car went 40' in .3 seconds  that's 108 mph. More photos... Acadia students in Randy Symonds' tech class engineered dragster cars using a design process in Autodesk Inventor a computer drawing program. With this they were able to identify the cars weight, projected frontal area, and anticipate an average speed.  One car went 40' in .3 seconds  that's 108 mph. More photos...

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